Increased online safety

During this time of school closures, students may have increased use of the internet.

Willenhall Academy recommend the following resources to support parents in keeping their children safe online.

 

To set up Parental controls on your home computers and mobiles then please see this website for advice: https://www.childnet.com/resources/parental-controls
For all the latest on new platforms that students are using such as snapchat, particularly on mobile devices, then please visit: https://www.childnet.com/resources/parental-controls
If you are worried about online sexual abuse then please contact both the Academy and CEOP: https://www.ceop.police.uk/safety-centre/
If you are concerned about any cyber-bullying then please contact the safeguarding team at Willenhall. Safegaurding@willenhalle-actacademy.org.uk

 

 

 

The UK Safer Internet Centre also has some useful information and can be accessed on: https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/safer-internet-day/safer-internet-day-2019/education-packs/activities-parents-and-carers
O2 and the NSPCC have come together to offer some really helpful advice on internet safety and the address is listed below: https://www.o2.co.uk/help/nspcc
Some useful advice for parents/carers on internet safety https://www.internetmatters.org/schools-esafety/parent-online-support-pack-teachers/
Further advice for parents/carers on internet safety https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/

 

 

 

PARENTS HELPSHEET: SECONDARY

 

 

 

Thinkuknow: keeping your child safe online while they are off school

 

 

Thinkuknow is the national online safety education programme from CEOP, the online child protection command of the National Crime Agency.

 

Thinkuknow helps parents, carers, teachers and others keep children safe from sexual abuse, offering learning activities, advice and support for children and young people aged 4-18 and their families.

 

While school is closed, here’s what you can do to keep your child stay safe while they are learning, staying in touch with family and friends, and having fun online.

 

 

 

8 steps to keep your child safe online this month

 

  1. Explore together: Ask your child to show you their favourite websites and apps and what they do on them. Listen, show interest and encourage them to teach you the basics of the site or app.

 

  1. Chat about online safety little and often: Young people are likely to want to explore new apps and websites this month, whether that’s for learning or for fun. Take this opportunity to talk to them about how to stay safe on these new services, and in general. Ask if anything ever worries them while they’re online. Make sure they know that if they ever feel worried, they can get help by talking to you or another adult they trust.

 

  1. Help your child identify trusted adults who can help them if they are worried: This includes you and other adults at home, as well as adults from wider family, school or other support services who they are able to contact at this time. Encourage them to draw a picture or write a list of their trusted adults.

 

  1. Be non-judgemental: Explain that you would never blame them for anything that might happen online, and you will always give them calm, loving support.

 

  1. Talk about how their online actions can affect others: If your child is engaging with others online, remind them to consider how someone else might feel before they post or share something. If they are considering sharing a photo/video of somebody else, they should always ask permission first.

 

  1. Parental controls: Make use of the parental controls available on your home broadband and any internet enabled device in your home. You can find out more about how to use parental controls by visiting your broadband provider’s website.

 

  1. Direct your child to age appropriate information about relationships and sex: It’s natural for young people to start exploring their sexual feelings online and adolescents are more inclined to take risks. It’s important to understand this and to talk to your child in a positive way. Thinkuknow, Brook, The Mix and Childline all provide age appropriate information about relationships and sex that you can signpost your child to.

 

  1. Make sure they know about CEOP: Young people can report a concern about grooming or sexual abuse to CEOP at ceop.police.uk/safety-centre/ and get support from a specialist Child Protection Advisor.

 

PARENTS HELPSHEET: SECONDARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support your child with Thinkuknow websites

 

The age-appropriate Thinkuknow websites are a great way to start and continue chats about online safety.

 

 

 

Our websites provide open and honest guidance for young people on friends, relationships and the internet, covering topics like dealing with pressure; consent; and getting support when you’re worried.

 

You’ll find lots more advice on keeping your child safe online at www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents.

 

 

If you’re worried that a child or young people can make a report to CEOP at

person is at risk of harm online, you should call the police. Young https://www.ceop.police.uk/safety-centre/.

 

 

 

 

Other recommended resources

 

Parent Info – Expert information for parents about building their child’s resilience both online and off. Produced by NCA-CEOP and Parent Zone. This free service can be embedded on to your child’s school website. www.parentinfo.org

 

Brook – Information and advice for young people on sexual health and wellbeing, including staying safe

 

online. https://www.brook.org.uk

 

The Mix – Support service for young people with information and advice on sex and relationships.

 

https://www.themix.org.uk

 

Internet Matters – A useful tool showing how to set parental controls across a range of devices and websites. http://www.internetmatters.org/parental-controls/interactive-guide/

 

NSPCC Net Aware – Provides reviews and guidance on the most popular social networks, apps and games that children use. https://www.net-aware.org.uk/

 

Childnet – Information and advice for parents and carers on supporting people online. https://www.childnet.com/resources/supporting-young-people-online

 

 

 

CEOP social media:

 

For up to date information and advice:

 

  • @CEOPUK on Twitter

 

  • ClickCEOP on Facebook

 

 

Ages Our internet, our choice – consent in a digital world
Quick
11

 

 

 

 

Below you will find quick activities to accompany our in-depth lesson plan to support the theme of ‘Our internet, our choice – Understanding consent in a digital world.’ The activities are designed to draw out a range of themes which are touched on in both the lesson plan and assembly including: supporting one another online, the importance of consent and permission online and the nature of the internet.

 

 

 

 

App attack

Use this Safer Internet Day as a chance to go through your current apps, online accounts

and subscriptions. Clear out any old posts or contacts you no longer wish to keep and

spend 10 minutes having a closer look at those terms and conditions and privacy policies. It’s a

great time to go through your privacy settings and ensure everything is in order. It might even be

 

the time to deactivate any old accounts that are still lingering.

 

You can find out more on how to control your settings and keep your information safe by visiting www.saferinternet.org.uk/advice-centre/young-people/resources-11-19s

 

 

 

SID TV

 

Watch the SID TV video for 7-11 year olds. Discuss the themes mentioned in the film about consent and sharing information online.

 

www.saferinternet.org.uk/sid-tv

 

 

 

 

 

Chatter Box origami

 

Using Appendix 1, print off the origami template and follow the instructions to making your Safer Internet Day 2019 ‘Chatter Box’.

 

You could also print out a blank ‘Chatter Box’ and encourage the young people to design their own using the logos of apps and emoji they like the most and their own questions about online experiences.

 

When the Chatter Boxes are finished it’s time to get those conversations started so encourage the young people to use them with their friends, teachers and families.

 

 Doodle and colour

Get creative and doodle your way to making a masterpiece! Check out Appendix 2 for some inspiration. Design your own by drawing the apps, websites, games, or even emoji you like the most, make sure you have a #SaferInternetDay2019 message in the middle.

 

You could even colour code the doodles based on how those online experiences make you feel, e.g. blue = calm, yellow = happy, purple = angry, green = entertained.

 

Why not get involved in our social media campaign for Safer Internet Day by showing your support and sharing your doodles online with the hashtag #SaferInternetDay2019 and

 

#OurInternetOurChoice @UK_SIC

 

Safer Internet Day 2019 – Together for a better internet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our internet, our choice  Page 1 of 2                                              

 

 

#SaferInternetDay2019

 

www.saferinternetday.org.uk

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

 

5 February 2019

 

 

Ages Our internet, our choice – consent in a digital world
Quick
11

 

 

 

 

Moral Compass – To share or not to share

 

Using Appendix 3 print off the compass points and put them up around the room. Then read each dilemma below to the young people, and ask them to move to the point which best suits how they feel about the dilemma. Discuss their reactions to the dilemmas as a group and use the ‘things to consider’ sheet in Appendix 3 to support with discussion questions.

 

  1. Sharing a screen shot with your friends of a conversation with another friend

 

  1. Sharing an image that has been going round school of someone in your year group that spilt food down themselves and didn’t realise

 

  1. Sharing an image you know your friend doesn’t like of themselves but you look good in it

 

  1. Sharing a link with your friends to a website which has information that could upset people or cause offense

 

  1. Sharing your opinion online about a controversial subject

 

 

Online vs Offline n ff
Using Appendix 4, reflect and discuss how likely you are to do something
online compared to offline. Discuss why certain things are more likely to
happen online than others and why this might be.

 

 

 

 

 

Online Consent Unpacked

 

Consent can be particularly tricky online as there are many different situations which require it but no one set way of obtaining it. Consent can be broken down into active, passive, and assumed consent. Use Appendix 5 to explore these different forms of consent and ask learners to identify when it has been given.

 

Follow up by asking learners to consider how they would classify consent and regroup the scenarios. This might be by situations they would/ wouldn’t be comfortable with or those which should/ shouldn’t obtain consent.

 

 

 

 

Data Jargon Buster

 

Provide learners with a copy of Appendix 6. Ask learners if they have seen any of the words listed on the left before. If so, where did they see them? Did they know what they meant?

 

Challenge them to match up the data and permission related jargon with the appropriate definition. Finish by asking learners what they could do if they see a word online which they don’t understand.

 

 

Safer Internet Day 2019 – Together for a better internet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our internet, our choice  Page 2 of 2                                              

 

 

 

#SaferInternetDay2019

 

www.saferinternetday.org.uk

 

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

 

5 February 2019

 

 

Ages

 11-14

 

many people
day?
do instagram
How
you online 3 every
have? How . stories
profiles use 100million
Answer3:
video many
every
uploaded
second? of 6
to How . Answer 6:
YouTube are
many
hours over 400 hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4
.
emails
How
minute?
aremany phone?
sent open
spam timesyou
every
103,447,520 doyour
4:Answer many day
How
a
first
called
social it
when
Answer 7: was launched?
popularapp
Pictaboo
Whichmedia
.
Snapchat 7

 

 

 

 

49,380

 

 

1,388,889

 

Instagram
photos on
minute? Answer 5:
many
posted
every 2:
Howare
Answer
.
5 7
How
you long
2
had
have .
media How
social are
# for? Facebook
second?created many
profilesnew
every

 

 

 

8:
40,000 1:Answer
second?
Google
every do   searches
How
does
many

 

 

Answer new by
many minute?
. How created
every
8 gifs are
Giphy
many day
How a
send?
messages
do you
1
.

 

 

Instructions to make your chatterbox:

 

  1. Cut out the black square

 

  1. Fold the square in half lengthways and across the middle.

 

  1. Turn the square over so the writing is facing down. Fold the four corners in to the middle.

 

  1. Turn the square over again and fold the new four corners into the middle.

 

  1. Fold in half so the questions face in

 

  1. Put your fingers in the pockets and now you’re ready to

 

Instructions to use your chatterbox:

 

  1. Ask someone one of the questions on the outside. The answer should be a number.

 

  1. Open and close the chatterbox the amount of times from the answer above.

 

  1. Then ask them to choose a number 1-4/5-8 and then ask that question.

 

  1. Lift up the question to reveal the answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the

 

Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

 11-14

 

4
.
do
you online 3
have? How .
profiles
many Answer3: 4:Answer
6
. Answer 6:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

openphone?

 

timesyou

 

manydoyour

 

day

Howa

 

 

 

 

Answer 7:

 

.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer 5:
you 2:
Answer
.
5
How
long .
had have
media 2
# social
for?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer 1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer 8:
.
8
many day
How a
send?
messages
do you
1
.

 

 

Instructions to make your chatterbox:

 

  1. Add your own questions to the outside triangles and add answers to the triangles within the diamond.

 

  1. Cut out the black square

 

  1. Fold the square in half lengthways and across the middle.

 

  1. Turn the square over so the writing is facing down. Fold the four corners in to the middle.

 

  1. Turn the square over again and fold the new four corners into the middle.

 

  1. Fold in half so the questions face in

 

  1. Put your fingers in the pockets and now you’re ready to go.

 

Instructions to use your chatterbox:

 

  1. Ask someone one of the questions on the outside. The answer should be a number.

 

  1. Open and close the chatterbox the amount of times from the answer above.

 

  1. Then ask them to choose a number 1-4/5-8 and then ask that question.

 

  1. Lift up the question to reveal the answer.

 

 

 

Co-financed by the

 

Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

 11-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#SaferInternetDay2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

 

Ages

 11-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#OurInternetOurChoice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

 

Ages

 11-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the

 

Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

 11-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the

 

Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

 11-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the

 

Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

11-14

Things to consider:

 

 

Dilemma… Things to consider…
XX How would the friend feel knowing a screenshot of their
Sharing a screen shot with your conversation had been shared?
XX Is it ok to share screenshots of private conversations?
friends of a conversation with
another friend XX Who owns the content in the screenshot? (You, the friend or joint?)
XX What might your other friends do with the screenshot?
Sharing an image that has been XX How might that person feel if they hear the photo is being shared
going round school of someone around?
in your year group that spilt food XX Just because others have shared it, does that make it ok for you to?
down themselves and didn’t
XX Why do these sorts of images get shared around?
realise
Sharing an image you know your XX How might it make your friend feel?
XX What could you do instead?
friend doesn’t like of themselves
XX How could you compromise in this situation? (cropping the image,
but you look good in it
taking another image)
XX Will you friends want to see the content of this link?
Sharing a link with your XX How might it make them feel?
friends to a website which has
XX Do they know what they will see when they click on the link?
information that could upset
people or cause offense XX What impact might it have on someone if they see something
upsetting or offensive that they weren’t prepared to see?
XX How might your opinion be received by others?
Sharing your opinion online XX Are you sharing your opinion or stating it as a fact?
about a controversial subject XX How will you respond if others disagree with you?
XX How can you respond if you disagree with others?

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the

 

Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

 11-14

 

Online vs Offline

 

How likely would you be to do the following things online and offline?

 

Most likely Least likely Most likely
NLINE FFLINE

 

Finding out something new

 

Giving away personal information

 

Complimenting someone

 

Finding out what someone did at the weekend

 

Accidently offending someone

 

Sharing your opinion

 

Being aware of a private conversation

 

Knowing what someone had for breakfast

 

Speaking to a friend

 

Inviting people to a party

 

Standing up for someone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

 

Ages

 11-14

 

Online Consent Unpacked

 

Ways we consent and give permission

 

 

ACTIVE PASSIVE ASSUMED
(also known as explicit consent) (also known as opt-out consent) (also known as implicit consent)
Means that an individual is clearly Means that an individual is given the Means that consent has been inferred
given an option to agree or disagree option to decline consent. If they do from an individual’s actions, current
to something happening and not do so within a set timeframe then situation or relationship to
understands fully what they are consent is granted by default. person/organisation.
agreeing to.

NO CONSENT GIVEN

 

Consent has not been

 

considered or requested in a situation and the individual is most likely not

 

aware of the situation.

 

 

All of these cards are mixed up and need sorting into the correct columns.

 

Your partner posts a photo of you You send your cousin a funny photo of You suddenly notice that your profile
One of your parents asks, “Can I send has been changed to public. You
together online saying you both together in a private message. did notice a notification about this
“Never been happier!” this photo of you to Grandad?” One of their friends shares it online and happening but you hadn’t got round to
it goes viral.
changing your settings.
A friend tells you they saw you on the Last time you went to the beach you
agreed that your friend could post
Your sister takes a photo of you asleep side of a bus. Someone took a photo
A friend adds you to a group chat. photos of you together. You go to the
on the sofa. of you at a Council event and they have
beach again, take some photos and
put you on their adverts.
they post these too.
You have started receiving newsletters You fell over in the corridor at school
When you are buying some trainers the from a company that you bought some Your school posts a photo of you on the and someone took a photo without
attendant asks for your email address in clothes from. When you check their site you realising. Later that day it has been
school’s social media.
order to send you the receipt. the box was pre-ticked for receiving the turned into a meme and shared around
newsletter. school.

 

 

Once you have sorted them into the correct columns consider how you would sort the scenarios?

Would you group consent differently? What would you call each group?

 

 

 

 

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

Ages

11-14

Answers
ACTIVE PASSIVE ASSUMED NO CONSENT GIVEN
(also known as explicit consent) (also known as opt-out consent) (also known as implicit consent) Consent has not been
Means that an individual is clearly given an Means that an individual is given the option Means that consent has been inferred from considered or requested in a situation and
the individual is most likely not aware of the
option to agree or disagree to something to decline consent. If they do not do so within an individual’s actions, current situation or
situation.
happening and a set timeframe then consent is granted by relationship to
understands fully what they are agreeing to. default. person/organisation.
When you are buying some trainers the A friend tells you they saw you on the Your partner posts a photo of you Your sister takes a photo of you asleep
attendant asks for your email address in side of a bus. Someone took a photo together online saying on the sofa.
order to send you the receipt. of you at a Council event and they have “Never been happier!” – You weren’t aware of the situation
– They asked you so you have a choice put you on their adverts. and didn’t have a choice.
– They assume that as you are in
to say no. – It may be that by attending the event
relationship this will be ok.
you consented to being in images. This
would have been written in the terms
and conditions.
Your school posts a photo of you on You suddenly notice that your profile has A friend adds you to a group chat. You send your cousin a funny photo of
the school’s social media. been changed to public. You did notice – They assume that they know you will you both together in a private message.
– They will have done so after obtaining a notification about this happening but enough to know that this will be ok. One of their friends shares it online and
permission to share images. you hadn’t got round to changing your it goes viral.
settings. – You only gave permission for your
– The timeframe given for changing cousin to share it.
settings for yourself has most likely
passed so this has been done for you.
One of your parents asks, “Can I send You have started receiving newsletters Last time you went to the beach you You fell over in the corridor at school
this photo of you to Grandad?” from a company that you bought some agreed that your friend could post and someone took a photo without
– They asked you and gave you a clothes from. When you check their site photos of you together. You go to the you realising. Later that day it has been
choice. the box was pre-ticked for receiving the beach again, take some photos and turned into a meme and shared around
newsletter. they post these too. school.
– The company have left it for you – They have assumed that as it was ok – You weren’t aware of the photo being
to change this and if you don’t then last time, it will be ok again this time. taken so could not choose how it would
consent is automatically granted. be used.

 

 

Co-financed by the Connecting Europe Facility of the European Union

 

 

Ages

 11-14  Data Jargon Buster     

 

 

Terms and

 

Conditions

 

 

Cookies

 

 

GDPR

 

 

 

Third Party

 

 

 

Restrictions

 

 

Modify

 

 

Breach

 

 

Copyright

 

 

Consent

 

 

Advertising

 

 

Licence

 

 

 

Rights

This stands for General Data Protection Regulation and is a law that protects the personal information of people living in the European Union. It’s a list of rules for all companies and organisations about what personal information they can collect, store and use and how they do these things.

 

To make a change to something. This could be online or offline.

 

Rules you agree to when you sign up to an app or create an online account. Often includes a list of things that you agree to do and a list of things the people running the app or service must do.

 

Not the chocolate chip kind! This is information recorded by a website when you visit it about what you saw or did on the site. This information is stored on your device. Next time you go back to the website it checks for the information it recorded last time and uses this to make the website work best for you, e.g. by showing you content that is similar to things you have viewed before.

 

Giving/ gaining permission for or from someone, an organisation, app or service to do something.

 

A statement provided by a company which denies responsibility for something, e.g. denying responsibility for the view shared on a forum.

 

A formally registered symbol which identifies the manufacturer or distributor of a product.

 

Something you can’t do. Think of the ‘Restricted Section’ in Harry Potter – that was where the books students weren’t allowed to read were kept. If you agree to anything under this heading, you’re agreeing to not do them.

 

Something which we all have as human beings. It means you can expect certain things in life, e.g.

freedom of expression.

 

The form of protection given to something by its creator which would stop someone else using it and claiming it as their own work.

 

You could use this word to say when someone breaks an agreement they’d made or breaks a rule.

 

You could use this to describe someone not directly involved in something. For example, an agreement between two people has a first and second party (the two people directly involved). This term describes anyone outside of that agreement who are not involved. Websites you go to can connect with other websites and share your habits and choices too. These websites are outside the agreement between you and the website you visited because you did not visit them but they are still able to track what you are doing.

 

 

Affiliates

 

 

Trademark

 

 

Disclaimer

 

Termination

To end an agreement.

 

 

A legal document giving official permission to do something.

 

 

When two things are closely connected or join together for one cause.

 

 

The promotion of a product or service.

 

 

Ages

 11-14

 

Answers
Terms and Rules you agree to when you sign up to an app or create an online account. Often includes a list of
Conditions things that you agree to do and a list of things the people running the app or service must do.
Not the chocolate chip kind! This is information recorded by a website when you visit it about what you
Cookies saw or did on the site. This information is stored on your device. Next time you go back to the website it
checks for the information it recorded last time and uses this to make the website work best for you, e.g. by
showing you content that is similar to things you have viewed before.
GDPR This stands for General Data Protection Regulation and is a law that protects the personal information
of people living in the European Union. It’s a list of rules for all companies and organisations about what
personal information they can collect, store and use and how they do these things.
You could use this to describe someone not directly involved in something. For example, an agreement
between two people has a first and second party (the two people directly involved). This term
Third Party describes anyone outside of that agreement who are not involved. Websites you go to can connect
with other websites and share your habits and choices too. These websites are outside the agreement
between you and the website you visited because you did not visit them but they are still able to track
what you are doing.
Restrictions Something you can’t do. Think of the ‘Restricted Section’ in Harry Potter – that was where the books
students weren’t allowed to read were kept. If you agree to anything under this heading, you’re agreeing to
not do them.
Modify To make a change to something. This could be online or offline.
Breach You could use this word to say when someone breaks an agreement they’d made or breaks a rule.
Copyright The form of protection given to something by its creator which would stop someone else using it and
claiming it as their own work.
Consent Giving/ gaining permission for or from someone, an organisation, app or service to do something.
Advertising The promotion of a product or service.
Licence A legal document giving official permission to do something.
Rights Something which we all have as human beings. It means you can expect certain things in life, e.g. freedom
of expression.
Affiliates When two things are closely connected or join together for one cause.
Trademark A formally registered symbol which identifies the manufacturer or distributor of a product.
Disclaimer A statement provided by a company which denies responsibility for something, e.g. denying
responsibility for the view shared on a forum.

 

 

 

 

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